Archbishop of Canterbury to visit South Sudan, Great Lakes region

first_imgArchbishop of Canterbury to visit South Sudan, Great Lakes region Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Sudan & South Sudan Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 27, 2014 at 7:29 pm Ann,While the BBC iplayer video version is unavailable outside the Uk, the audio version will be available at http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/ht when it goes to air on radio. Comments (2) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Ann Lamb says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 John Sandeman says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Africa, Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 27, 2014 at 4:36 pm Your link to the BBC interview with Archbishop Justin on promoting reconciliation is not available for viewing in the US. If there is a transcript, will you make it available? Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby will visit South Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo to meet Primates of the Anglican Communion, in a five-day visit to the region starting on Thursday this week.During his first 18 months in office, Archbishop Justin plans to visit all of his fellow Archbishops around the Anglican Communion. His desire is to express solidarity, build personal and professional bonds, understand the Primates’ work in their local contexts, and lay foundations for good collaboration over the coming years.Archbishop Justin spoke this week about the church’s role in promoting reconciliation in areas of conflict in this interview with BBC HARDTalk. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Jan 27, 2014 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

Christchurch quake-ravaged cathedral deadlock broken?

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Posted Mar 26, 2015 Submit a Press Release Christchurch quake-ravaged cathedral deadlock broken? Bishop commends wood, stone, copper design as possible way to rebuild Anglican Communion Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Anglican Taonga] Diocese of Christchurch Bishop Victoria Matthews has encouraged her diocese to consider a design by New Zealand architect Sir Miles Warren to rebuild the diocesan cathedral in the city’s Cathedral Square.Matthews has drawn the attention of her diocese to the lead story in the March 18 edition of The Press newspaper, which confirms that the Diocese of Christchurch has been talking again with Warren about his restoration scheme, as a way of breaking the four-year legal deadlock over the future of the ruined cathedral.Two years ago Warren, who is Christchurch’s most celebrated architect, had proposed that the iconic cathedral be rebuilt in lightweight modern materials – with a rebuilt, earthquake-strengthened stone base (to window sill height), wooden walls above that, and a copper-clad roof and spire.In essence, Warren’s scheme – which he had first proposed in late 2012 – is back on the table again.Compromise soughtChristchurch’s Church Property Trustees began talking with him again last December, as a way of seeking a compromise that might break the deadlock.In an email sent to diocesan members, Matthews writes that “the Church Property Trustees have not made a commitment to this or any other design for the Cathedral at this stage, so we are eager to know what people’s thoughts are.”The Press story says the Warren option would cost about $35 million and take three years to complete – though the Church Property Trustees estimate that when the costs of demolition and escalation are taken into account, the costs of the Warren scheme would be about the same as building a new cathedral from scratch.In May 2013, Warren had said that one of the “valid criticisms” of the ruined stone cathedral was that the congregation in the side aisles “was visually and acoustically separated from the nave by large, closely-spaced stone columns and arches.”Matthews pointed out that the sight-lines in the cathedral envisaged Warren would be much better – because the stone columns would be replaced by fewer slender wooden columns – and the floor would be on one level.The way it was supposed to be?“The ability to re-arrange the chairs in the Transitional Cathedral,” she wrote this morning “has convinced us that multiple seating options are essential for new builds and re-builds…  It is also worth noting that (by) using new materials, the weight of the Cathedral would be less than a tenth of what the Cathedral in the Square weighed.”Ironically, Warren’s vision for the cathedral is to rebuild as it was supposed to be, but never was.When he was commissioned to design the cathedral in 1858, George Gilbert Scott had proposed that it should be built in wood – as  Auckland’s St Mary’s pro-cathedral and Wellington’s Old St Paul’s were.But Scott’s first design was vetoed by church authorities, who insisted that the entire building be built in stone.A March 2013 Press article in which Warren outlines his design more fully, click here . Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

‘What if it were you?’ Responding to the refugee crisis…

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (4) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis John Adam says: Comments are closed. October 20, 2015 at 2:56 pm Dear brothers in Christ,seems like you are afraid of the stranger.John from Germany,who has had personal contact with refugeesand has listened to their stories. Anthony Price says: Submit a Job Listing ‘What if it were you?’ Responding to the refugee crisis in Belgium Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY By Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 13, 2015 October 14, 2015 at 11:46 am Ed’s point is undeniable. This migration is similar to our southern border crisis over a year ago with unaccompanied children and other fragile people being used as shields and pawns by the drug cartels to overwhelm our border security while they escalated their criminal enterprises. Now this. Healthy, well-fed young (mainly Muslim) men among the fragile refugees. It doesn’t take any imagination to see that the plan.Interestingly, a generation ago, Jewish WW 2 holocaust refugees (which no country stepped forward to meaningfully resettle) were given a sliver of land to settle in Palestine. They and their children have been criticized ever since. The Arabs soon wanted the same space even though whole, vastly larger countries were created in the region to accommodate them. Today, when Israel defends itself against the daily hail of rocket fire and violence from its Arab neighbors loud voices call for them to squeeze together more, give up more, and get along more. Our refugee work needs some refinement. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Refugees Migration & Resettlement Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ed Lane says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN October 22, 2015 at 10:00 am Congratulations to All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Belgium for taking a leading position on the refugee crisis. Well done! Et bonnes photos, Felicity. Il y a beaucoup des ans que nous ne voyons pas. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA This article is the first in a weeks-long series that explores the response to the global refugee crisis by The Episcopal Church and its ecumenical and interfaith partners.A sign hanging on the fence outside a refugee camp in Brussels in September asks the question “What if it were you?” Photo: Sunny Hallanan[Episcopal News Service – Brussels, Belgium] Etched on a sign outside a makeshift refugee camp in north Brussels were the words “Et si c’était toi?”For the Rev. Sunny Hallanan and her parishioners at All Saints Episcopal Church in nearby Waterloo, Belgium, that question – “What if it were you?” – has been a constant reminder that those escaping conflict and persecution need to be treated with compassion and respect rather than suspicion and fear.After a month volunteering at the camp in Maximilien Park, Hallanan got to know many of the refugees. Although she didn’t speak much Arabic and they had yet to grasp basic French, just to sit with the refugees and to share the few words they did know seemed to be enough to form friendships and build trust.In Brussels, the Rev. Sunny Hallanan, left, joins a Sept. 27 solidarity march in support of refugees. Photo: Felicity HandfordHallanan met doctors, dentists, lawyers, teachers, shopkeepers, a physicist – people who back home in Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and other conflict zones had shared the same kinds of dreams and responsibilities that she had until war and extremism forced them to flee for their lives. Although they look different and have different customs and religions, they are more like her than she could have imagined, Hallanan thought. “What if it were me?” she asked, surrounded by refugees one rainy October morning outside a Red Cross processing center near Brussels’ Gare du Nord train station.“A lot of these people have come here to escape religious extremism. As people come here, they join into the local culture, and they’ve learned a lesson of how devastating religious extremism can be,” she said. “A lot of these people are young men whose choice was: join ISIS (the self-styled Islamic State) or be beheaded. So we have to keep them here. We can’t send them back to that.”On any given day, the volunteers at the camp would be assigned various jobs, such as cleaning the kitchen or toilets, serving food, picking up litter or putting up tents.The Rev. Sunny Hallanan volunteers at the refugee camp in Maximilien Park, Brussels. Photo: Felicity Handford“It’s not glamorous work, but it’s essential for creating for these people as good an environment as possible,” said All Saints parishioner Felicity Handford, who had volunteered at the camp until it was dismantled at the end of September.But for Handford, building friendships with refugees and other volunteers was a really important part of the ministry.“The first time I came to the tent city, I was a little bit nervous about talking to people,” she said.But then a group of men from Afghanistan invited Handford to sit down and join them so that they could share their experiences with her. Although they didn’t speak the same languages as her and communication was difficult, Handford said it was clear that these refugees were eager to build relationships with the local people.“When you talk to people, they cease to be statistics,” said Handford. “They’re not problems; they’re people who’ve been driven out of their country. They’re now facing a really difficult journey, and that is integration into a completely different environment and completely different culture. How we as a community deal with that will make the difference in the relationships we have with their countries after this mess is over, and that for me is critical.”A boy from Iraq offers a peace sign from his temporary home at the refugee camp in Brussels. According to UNHCR, half of all refugees are children. Photo: Felicity HandfordAlthough in recent months the media has focused on Syrian refugees fleeing war and seeking asylum in Europe, the violence in Syria is just one of the ongoing conflicts in the crisis. Decades of war and violence in places like Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq and Myanmar have forced citizens to flee and prevented their ability to return home.In Belgium, 5,512 asylum applications were filed in September. By comparison, Germany, which has adopted an open-door policy to those seeking asylum, took in more than 200,000 the same month.The U.S. government has announced it will increase the number of refugees being resettled to the U.S. from 70,000 to 85,000 in 2016. At least 10,000 of these refugees will be from Syria. Many will be assisted by Episcopal Migration Ministries, the refugee resettlement service of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)For more than 75 years, The Episcopal Church has welcomed refugees to the United States, helping them find safety, security and new lives as American citizens.“Every year, Episcopal Migration Ministries works with local resettlement partners, congregations, and individual volunteers, to welcome refugees to the United States from the world’s most war-torn places,” Deb Stein, director of Episcopal Migration Ministries, told ENS. “This is a life-saving and transformative ministry, one that gives every Episcopalian a way to respond to a global crisis on the local level.”A Syrian refugee family are assisted by volunteers as they arrive at the camp in Brussels. Photo: Ahcene TighrineSince 2013, Episcopal Relief & Development has been responding to the refugee crisis through regional partnerships. With the recent crisis, the agency is working with Islamic Relief to provide support for people arriving in the Greek islands, collaborating with Us (formerly USPG) and the Church of England’s Diocese in Europe to offer emergency aid to those fleeing their home countries through Athens, and partnering with the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe and its congregations as they offer hospitality and welcoming safe spaces as people journey through the continent.“Faith communities are well placed to play a unique role in the crisis,” Nagulan Nesiah, program officer for Episcopal Relief & Development, told ENS. “Once the people settle in the countries where they are able to file asylum, there will be a long-term role for relevant organizations to assist with transition and integration. Congregations in the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe operate multiple resettlement ministries. In fact, some of them have been running for decades. These ministries embody a key strength of the church to maintain a permanent presence in communities and serve as an invaluable asset to vulnerable people.”All Saints parishioners Janvier Nzamutuma (left) and Felicity Handford (middle) listen to the concerns of an Iraqi refugee about the time it takes to process new arrivals in Belgium. Photo: Matthew DaviesBack in Belgium, Janvier Nzamutuma, a refugee forced to flee from Rwanda during the 1994 genocide, is another All Saints parishioner who had volunteered at the Brussels camp.Having lost both parents, three sisters and an older brother to the Rwanda genocide, Nzamutuma could relate to the traumas of war and persecution and the journeys that the refugees had experienced.When he left Rwanda, Nzamutuma traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where he stayed at a refugee camp for several years. It was this experience that he recalled when the Brussels camp started up and why he felt the need to volunteer there.“I met one refugee from Syria who told me that … he was traveling by bus … and he took his brothers and sisters and mother, and everybody was shot – and he reached here alone, so this was comparative to what I had experienced,” Nzamutuma told ENS, standing outside the now-fenced-off Maximilien Park.When they heard that the tent city was to be dismantled at the end of September and the refugees evicted from their temporary canvas homes, the volunteers were concerned about where the refugees might end up.But it was a strategy of Platforme Citoyenne de Soutien aux Réfugiés Bruxelles (Citizens Platform for the Support of Brussels Refugees), the organization that had run the camp, to force the local authorities to take more responsibility for the new arrivals.“The fact that the line outside the government offices is shorter today is a really promising sign because it must mean that they’re taking more in,” said Hallanan, arriving to see the empty park in early October. “So the Platforme Citoyenne strategy seems to have worked.”Thousands of people take to the streets of Brussels on Sept. 27 for a solidarity march in support of refugees. Photo: Felicity HandfordLike Hallanan, many Episcopalians and their ecumenical partners throughout Europe don’t see their response to the world’s worst refugee crisis since World War II as short term.“Our churches in Europe, with the current refugee crisis, have stepped up all over the place,” said Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, “not only [to provide] basic needs, but also counseling for the asylum process.”Bishop Pierre Whalon helps to volunteer with some construction work at the refugee camp in Brussels in September. Photo: Ahcene TighrineIn addition to the response in Belgium, Whalon recognized the work of Episcopalians in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Hungary and beyond in the midst of the crisis. “It’s an extremely arduous, difficult task, but all over the place we have incredibly creative volunteers, dedicated clergy,” said Whalon, who had visited the Brussels camp in September and helped to build tables out of pallets for the refugees. “We’re making a difference in every community that we’re in, and we are only just starting to address this new crisis. It’s spontaneous, and it’s something I am very proud of.”Handford learned during her time in the camp that many of the refugees are well educated – “people who have skills and gifts that if we allow them to develop here, will bring something to society here. But we have to get over this fear of differences.”The Rev. Sunny Hallanan gets to know refugees from Iraq who arrived in Belgium three months earlier. Photo: Matthew Davies“Diversity is a wonderful thing for people everywhere,” said Hallanan. “If God made people who are different from us, we should get to know them and share in them and rejoice. Who knows what wonders people will work in Europe and in our midst, through these people who come and bring us a different perspective?”For Handford, Hallanan, Nzamutuma and the entire All Saints community, their volunteering has been a hands-on ministry that has added an important new dimension to the parish’s outreach and one that they intend to expand.But there is one question that will continue to drive their response:“Et si c’était toi?”– Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.Resources for education and responseEducational webinar, sponsored by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, examines global refugee crisis. , 8 p.m. EDT, Oct. 15. Further information is available here.The most recent updates from Episcopal Relief & Development about its response to the refugee crisis, as well as ways to donate, are available here.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori’s statement on refugees and congregational and individual response suggestions are available here. Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Doug Desper says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY October 13, 2015 at 4:31 pm We need to face the fact that Europe is being overrun in the latest Crusade. Take a look at the men ‘escaping’ from war-torn lands. They are in good physical condition. Take a look at the women in the pictures with this story … heads covered. They are coming for Christians and daring us to stop them. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

Llevar la Iglesia al pueblo: cenizas, cenizas por todas partes

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Pat McCaughan Posted Feb 9, 2016 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY La Rda. Donna S. Mote, capellán episcopal del Aeropuerto Internacional Hartsfield-Jackson de Atlanta, ofrecerá “Cenizas en vuelo” a pasajeros de viajes nacionales e internacionales a lo largo de todo el día el Miércoles de Ceniza. Foto por cortesía de Donna S. Mote.[Episcopal News Service] Hay, cada vez más, “Cenizas para llevar” “Mánchate y sigue”, “Cenizas en el auto” “Cenizas en vuelo”  y ahora “Cuaresma en una bolsa” al tiempo que toda clase de iglesias —episcopales, luteranas, metodistas— están llevando la observancia tradicional del Miércoles de Ceniza fuera de los muros de la iglesia.La Rda. Donna S. Mote, capellana episcopal del Aeropuerto Internacional Hartsfield-Jackson de Atlanta, dice que ofrecerá “Cenizas en vuelo” a pasajeros de viajes nacionales e internacionales a lo largo de todo el día el Miércoles de Ceniza.“Estoy fuera y deambulando, lo cual es mi estilo habitual”, dijo Mote, de 51 años, quien describe su parroquia como “1.900 hectáreas, en un sentido geográfico” a través de las cuales pasan unos 274.000 pasajeros cada día. Si los años anteriores le sirven de indicador, espera imponer cenizas a centenares de personas de una variedad de religiones, nacionalidades y creencias. Ella ha descrito algunos de sus encuentros en Facebook.Mote dice que lleva las cenizas a los espacios públicos porque los recordatorios de la mortalidad, la humildad y la restauración pertenecen al ámbito donde está la gente, y [contribuyen] a establecer influyentes conexiones aun más allá del contexto de una liturgia formal.Como una joven “el año pasado que me preguntó cómo podría explicarle la Cuaresma a personas que no la guardan”, dijo Mote.O una empleada del aeropuerto que le dijo a Mote que ella quería  la ceniza, pero que nunca antes se la habían impuesto y que no estaba segura de lo que significaba. “¿Qué crees que significa?”, le preguntó Mote. Y su respuesta: “Creo que significa que he logrado organizar mi vida, pero que voy a necesitar alguna ayuda’. Yo le dijo, ‘creo que eso es lo que significa’”, afirmó Mote.Pero la mayoría de los que se acercan a la Rda. Mote revestida “no dicen nada en absoluto. Simplemente se acercan e inclinan la frente, incluso aquellos cuyo primer idioma no es el inglés. Es muy convincente. Uno no tiene que hablar el mismo idioma para que se produzca un importante evento sacro”.El Rdo. Harry Jenkins, rector de la iglesia episcopal de Cristo [Christ Episcopal Church] en Slidell, Luisiana, se propone ofrecer cenizas, oraciones y una “Cuaresma en una bolsa” a devotos motorizados.En la bolsa de papel se incluyen: un ejemplar de las Meditaciones de Cuaresma 2016 de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, arena, una piedra, una figura humana, una vela y una cruz, dijo Jenkins.“Cada cosa va acompañada de una pregunta o una breve descripción para que piensen en su significado”, explicó Jenkins. “Básicamente, la arena es para reflexionar sobre Jesús yéndose al desierto. La piedra podría ser un par de cosas: cuando a Jesús lo invitan a transformar una piedra en pan y sobre el hambre en el mundo y que podamos orar por los hambrientos.“Hay una figura humana para recordarnos que decimos que Jesús es plenamente humano, pero fundamentalmente que él nos entiende desde dentro de nuestra piel. Sabemos por experiencia que cada uno de nosotros es capaz de grandes cosas. Podrían reflexionar sobre dónde se encuentra Cristo en nuestra vida durante la Cuaresma”.La vela es para fines de meditación y como un recordatorio dual de que Jesús es la luz del mundo, y que no escondas tu luz debajo de un almud. La pregunta sería, ¿Dónde brillas con tu luz?”.“Y luego la cruz es, ¿cómo seguimos a Cristo? ¿Qué cruces llevamos? Recordamos tomar diariamente nuestra cruz y seguir a Jesús”, dijo él.La bolsa también incluye un programa de oficios de Cuaresma y, para una iglesia que tiene un promedio de asistencia regular de unas 70 personas en los oficios dominicales, las cenizas en el auto atrajo a cerca de 300 el año pasado “la mayoría de las cuales no son miembros de nuestra iglesia”, añadió Jenkins.De muchas maneras “responde a las necesidades de las personas que tienen temores de ir a la iglesia. Tal vez han tenido malas experiencias y no quieren entrar en el edificio. Creemos que es algo que podemos hacer y en verdad nos gusta [hacerlo]”.La iglesia también ofrece un oficio de puertas adentro a mediodía y a las 7:00 PM y Jenkins dijo que la iglesia comenzó “Cuaresma en una bolsa” el año pasado como algo adicional para llevar.“Hemos tenido a personas que empiezan a venir a la iglesia como resultado de Cenizas para llevar. No en cifras enormes, pero algunos se han incorporado. Resulta significativo para los participantes, para los que vienen a buscar las ceniza, para los miembros de la iglesia que les ayudan. Se añade a nuestra experiencia cuaresmal”, afirmó.En Tulsa, Oklahoma, la Rda. Kristina Maulden, de 49 años, dijo que será el segundo año consecutivo en que impone cenizas debajo de la marquesina de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad [Trinity Episcopal Church].El año pasado, Maulden, rectora asociada, estuvo de pie fuera desde las 11:00 AM hasta la 1 PM y oró con unas 60 personas “que bien eran discapacitadas o que traían a cónyuges que no podían entrar en la iglesia. Hubo personas que no habían estado en la iglesia en mucho tiempo y esto resultaba una manera fácil de volver.“Y teníamos personas que no podían asistir al oficio, que no podían encontrar donde estacionar”, explicó, refiriéndose a la iglesia del centro de la ciudad que tiene una asistencia promedio de alrededor de 500 personas. “Me asombró, estos momentitos de llegarme hasta el auto de alguien e imponerle la ceniza… fue como un espacio muy tenue, un momento sagrado en el que hacemos un alto en nuestra jornada y nos acordamos de nuestra mortalidad. Es tan raro que podamos acercarnos a alguien de esa manera  en nuestro quehacer diario. Hubo personas que, después de recibir la ceniza se fueron conduciendo con lágrimas en los ojos”.Lo más importante, añadió, es llevar la Iglesia a la gente, “ir adonde está la gente, no importa en la situación en que se encuentre, y decirle que la Iglesia también está aquí a su servicio”.Aunque algunos de su congregación entienden el esfuerzo, “otros creen que es un poquito efectista”, dijo ella. “Es difícil trascender esa opinión a menos que uno esté realmente en el auto cuando algo como esto sucede. Sólo espero que la gente le conceda el beneficio de la duda porque hay gracia en esto”.En Michigan, docenas de iglesias protestantes y episcopales están ofreciendo tanto “Cenizas para llevar” como “Cenizas en el auto”, incluso por cuarto año, dijo la Rda. June Marshall Smith de la Iglesia Metodista Unida en Novi.Ella se sintió motivada a ofrecer cenizas afuera después de que ella misma se empeñara [infructuosamente] en encontrar un culto que le conviniera hace unos años. “Nadie tenía servicios de culto por la mañana. Y pensé, ¿qué sentido tiene ir al culto a las 7:00PM si me voy a ir a dormir a las 9:00 PM. Quiero llevar la ceniza [en la frente] todo el día”.El servicio es “una obra de amor” y a ella le divierte.“Un año, con temperaturas bajo cero y yo me estaba preguntando por qué estaba haciendo esto. Luego algunos se acercaron llorando porque significaba mucho para ellos”.Otro año, ella creó un cartel: ‘Obtenga sus cenizas aquí’, dijo riendo por lo bajo.  Smith se mantiene de pie debajo de un pórtico cerca del edificio de la iglesia y también ofrece un folleto con oraciones y un recordatorio a penitentes transeúntes que un modo de compartir su fe es hablarle a otros de la mancha que llevan en la frente.Hay un continuo tránsito, explicó, citando furgonetas con sillas de ruedas, furgonetas de grupos de ancianos y también una mujer que condujo 144 kilómetros por la ceniza porque no había encontrado ningún otro lugar durante el día donde se las impusieran.“Un hombre paralizado de la cintura para abajo viene todos los años”, dijo Smith. Y aunque ella espera nieve espesa y frío, planea prepararse otra vez este 10 de febrero, con medias de lana y botas de suela de cuero, de pie sobre una alfombra y moviéndose constantemente para mantenerse en calor.Ella también se propone celebrar tres oficios dentro de la iglesia, a las 6:30 AM, a las 7 AM y a las 7 PM. “Pasamos muy buen rato, es algo estupendo. Esperaría que las iglesias lo probaran. Cuando vean el impacto que tiene en los corazones de la gente, no creo que se arrepientan y no lo vuelvan a hacer”.Cuando la iglesia evangélica luterana Adviento [Advent Evangelical Lutheran Church] en Columbus, Ohio, comenzó a ofrecer cenizas en los autos de 11AM a 1 PM el año pasado, cerca de 76 autos se aparecieron.El Rdo. Aaron Layne, de 36 años, que al principio estaba “en la cerca al respecto, ¿estamos sirviendo a una sociedad apresurada  que cada vez tiene menos tiempo para Dios? ¿Estamos haciéndoselo demasiado fácil, sabes, para que digan sí he cumplido hoy con una tradición religiosa y puedo andar andando por ahí con una mancha en la frente y eso no significa nada”.Pero después de que 76 autos se presentaron, entre ellos el de un padre católico cuyo hijo tenía un cáncer de 4to. grado y no podía correr el riesgo de pescar una infección por estar en público, Layne se convenció.Otra mujer dijo que ella vino porque el oficio de su iglesia local era a las 7 PM “y esa es la hora de acostar a mi hijo. La iglesia no me ofrece ningún lugar adonde ir. Pensé que era realmente formidable salir al encuentro de las personas donde ellas se encuentran y es por eso que voy a seguir haciéndolo”.“Para mí se trata del dicho que la iglesia ha dejado el edificio. Si en verdad afirmamos el hecho de que somos la Iglesia y la Iglesia es el pueblo, supongo que no debe realmente importar donde celebramos nuestros oficios. Con todas esas justificaciones, y el hecho de que sinceramente vimos a Cristo la última vez que lo hicimos, estoy impaciente por ver cómo Cristo se muestra esta vez”.Pero en la iglesia episcopal de San Francisco de las Islas [St. Francis of the Islands] en Savannah, Georgia, la Rda. Lauren Flowers Byrd dijo que aunque la iglesia participó el año pasado, ellos decidieron no hacerlo este año.“Soy una de esa gente que cree que uno tiene que detenerse a meditar en su mortalidad, no esa cosa de pasar en un auto”, dijo Byrd a ENS. “Para mí es algo que amerita un pausa, tomarse el tiempo para detenerse y participar en ello [en la liturgia] por un rato.“Es como si te invistieras de tiempo, tiempo mortal, cuando te imponen la ceniza en la cabeza.A falta de ese tipo de gracia, puedo ver lo que la Iglesia busca en la calle, llegar a personas allí donde las vidas mortales realmente se viven”.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Lent In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Llevar la Iglesia al pueblo: cenizas, cenizas por todas partes Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

‘One United People’ focuses on resettlement in advance of UN…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Refugees Migration & Resettlement Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries, Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Comments (1) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries sponsored “One United People: A Dialogue on Refugee Resettlement and Faithful Welcome,” in advance of two high-level summits scheduled next week to address the large movements of refugees and migrants. Photo: Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] Of the 21.3 million refugees in the world today, 1 percent might be resettled. It’s a lottery with dismal odds.In 2017, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that 1.19 million refugees will need to be resettled. Next week, during a historic summit of heads of state and government, countries will be asked to take in these refugees.“In 2015, just over 100,000 refugees benefited from resettlement,” said Karen Koning AbuZayd, a U.N. special advisor, on Sept. 14. “That sounds good, but now we want to multiply that by 10. The gap is large. The ambition is high.”Karen Koning AbuZayd speaks during “One United People: A Dialogue on Refugee Resettlement and Faithful Welcome,” a Sept. 14 event sponsored by Episcopal Migration Ministries. Photo: Lynette WilsonAbuZayd, who serves as an advisor to the U.N. secretary general on next week’s summit, spoke to the more than 60 people – U.N. officials, refugee resettlement professionals, former refugees and supporters and advocates – who gathered Sept. 14 at the Episcopal Church Center in New York for “One United People: A Dialogue on Refugee Resettlement and Faithful Welcome,” a panel event sponsored by Episcopal Migration Ministries. The event was webcast and later will be available online here.One United People preceded two United Nations events scheduled for next week. On Monday, Sept. 19, the U.N. General Assembly will host the first-ever meeting of heads of state and government to address the large movements of refugees and migrants, aimed at unifying countries behind a more human and coordinated approach.Then, on Tuesday, Sept. 20, President Barack Obama will host the Leaders’ Summit on Refugees, alongside co-hosts Canada, Ethiopia, Germany, Jordan, Mexico and Sweden. The leaders’ summit will appeal to governments to pledge increased commitments to resettle refugees.“Resettlement does not end when the refugee arrives in a new country. In many ways this is just the starting point,” said AbuZayd.It’s the faith communities, she said, especially in the United States, that carry out resettlement work.Maher Shakir, center, a former Iraqi refugee, shares his experience during a Sept. 14 panel discussion on refugee resettlement. Jay Subedi, left, a former refugee from Bhutan, and Akram Hussein, right, also originally from Iraq, also shared their experiences. Photo: Lynette WilsonDuring the seven-member panel discussion, resettlement professionals, refugee advocates and supporters, and former refugees shared their personal and professional experiences. One thing the former refugees want people to understand is that no one leaves home without a good reason.“No one wants to leave home. The only reason people leave home is because home is on fire,” said Abdul Saboor, a former refugee from Afghanistan who now lives in Syracuse, New York, where he’s a college student and works for InterFaith Works Center for New Americans.Episcopal Migration Ministries, the church’s refugee resettlement ministry, works with 30 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses, providing direct assistance to recent arrivals. It also offers ways for congregations to engage in refugee resettlement in their communities and encourages Episcopalians to join the Episcopal Public Policy Network and advocate for policies that protect the rights of refugees and asylum seekers.The number of refugees doesn’t tell the whole story, however. Worldwide, war and persecution have forced a total of 65.3 million people from their homes, four times more than a decade ago and the largest number of people displaced since World War II.The summit comes not only at a time of record numbers of refugees, but also at a time of increased discrimination and violence against immigrants and migrants. The refugee crisis has fueled nationalist movements across Europe, where fear of terrorism and xenophobia have gripped societies and have led governments to take restrictive measures. The same is true in part of the United States where states have introduced legislation either to ban refugees from their states or to weaken the U.S. government’s resettlement program.Allison Duvall, Episcopal Migration Ministries manager for church relations and engagement, moderated the Sept. 14 panel discussion where resettlement professionals, refugee advocates and supporters, and former refugees shared their personal and professional experiences. Photo: Lynette Wilson“We’re gathering here today … in advance of and support of the spirit and goals of the summit. In the face of this ‘crisis of solidarity,’ the Episcopal Church stands, active and ready, to respond to this crisis of our time,” Allison Duvall, said EMM’s manager for church relations and engagement. “We stand in solidarity with the aims of the summit, nations of the world hosting refugees, those enacting or expanding their resettlement programs, with communities that welcome their new neighbors through resettlement, and, most importantly, we stand in solidarity with refugees themselves.”On average, a refugee spends a quarter century in a refugee camp before resettlement; UNHCR is responsible for 16.1 million refugees, the majority of them are living in Africa and the Middle East. (The other 5.1 million are Palestinian refugees registered by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency).The Episcopal Church plans to hold U.N. member states accountable to their commitments, and to advocate for increases in country’s commitments to resettle refugees, said Lacy Broemel, the church’s refugee and immigration policy analyst.An observer delegation representing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry will attend the Sept. 19 summit, where member states are expected to adopt a comprehensive framework and protocols for safe, orderly and regular migration in advance of the leaders’ appeal to countries to increase the number of refugees they resettle.Whereas Episcopal Migration Ministries works with affiliates in communities across the United States, the Episcopal Church and Episcopalians advocate for refugees at the national level through the work of its Washington, D.C.-based office of government relations, and the Episcopal Public Policy Network.“In the U.S., Episcopalians advocate to Congress and the [president’s] administration to urge robust funding for refugees to thrive in their new communities and advocate for just and humane policies to welcome refugees and migrants,” said Broemel, who works in Washington, D.C. “We work to educate our neighbors and friends about the conditions refugees face, and highlight the moral imperative for refugees to come to the U.S.”The Episcopal Church has worked to resettle refugees in the United States since the 1930s. Episcopal Migration Ministries is one of nine agencies working in partnership with the State Department to welcome and resettle refugees; this year 85,000 refugees, or new Americans, are expected to arrive.The Episcopal Church’s work and support for programs that serve refugees extend beyond U.S. borders.In the Episcopal-Anglican Diocese of El Salvador, Cristosal is leading the effort in Central America’s Northern Triangle to provide emergency protection and legal representation to victims of forced displacement and to facilitate regional resettlement. The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe is involved in several ministries and partnerships to support refugees. At St. Paul’s Within the Walls Episcopal Church in Rome, Italy, the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center provides meals, job and language training, and community gathering space for refugees, many of whom come from Africa and the Middle East. In France, the Episcopal Church has since 2007 worked to resettle, provide services to and help to integrate Iraqi refugees, and also now assists Syrian refugees, through L’Association d’entraide aux minorités d’Orient.– Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. By Lynette Wilson Posted Sep 15, 2016 Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel ‘One United People’ focuses on resettlement in advance of UN events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET September 22, 2016 at 12:55 pm A week later, and the program is still not available at the link? Disappointing. Rector Smithfield, NC Lou Hays says: last_img read more

Long Island names Pat Mitchell canon for pastoral care

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN [Episcopal Diocese of Long Island] Bishop Larry Provenzano announced July 24 the appointment of the Rev. Patricia S. Mitchell as canon for pastoral care of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island.Mitchell will support and provide resources to clergy and lay leadership, support and supervise vocational deacons on behalf of the diocesan bishop, and provide direct pastoral support for retired clergy and their families. Additionally, she will serve as the diocesan intake officer for any Title IV allegations.Provenzano said, “”I’m looking forward to working with Canon Mitchell. She brings a wealth of personal, professional and church organization experience to this new position among us.”Most recently, Mitchell served as canon missioner for the Mount Vernon, New York, Episcopal Ministry. She has also served as canon for Christian formation in the Diocese of New York and was an associate rector at St. Bartholomew’s Church in Manhattan.Mitchell, who grew up in Queens and was a member of Grace Episcopal Church in Jamaica, is a graduate of the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale and was ordained in 2002. She is also a graduate of Columbia University with master’s degrees in psychology and clinical psychology and has worked in mental health and special education fields in university and hospital settings. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Jul 25, 2017 Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Long Island names Pat Mitchell canon for pastoral care AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET People Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

Tribunal Supremo de Carolina del Sur dictamina sobre caso de…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN [Episcopal News Service] En un veredicto complejo emitido el 2 de agosto, el Tribunal Supremo de Carolina del Sur dijo que la mayoría, pero no todas, las congregaciones de la Diócesis Episcopal de Carolina del Sur cuyos líderes abandonaron la Iglesia Episcopal no podían continuar conservando la propiedad de la Iglesia.Los magistrados dijeron que 29 de las congregaciones convinieron específicamente a atenerse al [llamado] “Canon Dennis” (Canon 1.7.4), que  establece que una parroquia tiene su propiedad en fideicomiso a favor de la diócesis y de la Iglesia Episcopal. Ese acuerdo significa que [esas congregaciones] no pueden mantener la propiedad de la iglesia. Sin embargo, [los magistrados] dijeron que ocho congregaciones no habían convenido con el canon y en consecuencia podían conservar esas propiedades.El campamento y centro de conferencias diocesano de San Cristóbal [St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center] en la isla de Seabrook también debe ser devuelto a la Iglesia Episcopal.Los episcopales en Carolina del Sur han estado reorganizando su vida común desde fines de 2012 luego de que el entonces obispo Mark Lawrence y una mayoría de clérigos y de líderes laicos diera a conocer que la diócesis había abandonado la Iglesia Episcopal. Discrepaban con la denominación sobre temas de autoridad bíblica y teología, y fundamentalmente sobre la plena inclusión de personas LGBT en la vida de la Iglesia.“Agradecemos este veredicto y la ardua labor del tribunal para rendirlo. También damos gracias a Dios por la fidelidad, el apoyo y los sacrificios de incontables episcopales dentro de nuestra diócesis y a través de la Iglesia”, dijo el obispo provisional de Carolina del Sur Gladstone B. Adams III (“Skip” ) en una carta dirigida al clero y a los líderes  laicos luego de que se emitiera el dictamen.“Este es un veredicto largo y detallado, y nuestro equipo legal y nuestro liderazgo lo estudiarán minuciosamente en los próximos días. Es importante notar que el sistema legal permite períodos de revisión judicial y de posible apelación, de manera que pasará algún tiempo antes de que podamos decir con certeza cómo se presenta el camino a seguir”.El grupo liderado por Lawrence dijo después de que se conociera el dictamen que su consejo legal está “revisando el veredicto, sus implicaciones y deliberando acerca de la respuesta apropiada”.Las partes tienen 15 días para decidir si piden una segunda vista.El grupo disidente presentó una demanda contra la Iglesia Episcopal en enero de 2013. La diócesis entró en la demanda después. Luego de un proceso de tres semanas en julio de 2014, la juez  del tribunal de circuito Diane S. Goodstein falló en febrero de 2015 que el grupo disidente tenía el derecho de conservar el nombre diocesano y la propiedad, incluidos los edificios de iglesias individuales.El Tribunal Supremo del estado aceptó en abril de 2015 considerar el caso. Al tribunal le llevó más de dos años emitir su veredicto.Los episcopales que permanecieron [fieles a la Iglesia nacional] hicieron una oferta en junio de 2015 que 35 parroquias podían conservar sus propiedades, optaran o no por seguir siendo parte de la Iglesia Episcopal.A cambio, la propuesta exigía que el grupo disidente devolviera las propiedades y bienes diocesanos, así como la identidad de la “Diócesis Episcopal de Carolina del Sur” a la diócesis que sigue estando afiliada con la Iglesia Episcopal. El grupo disidente rechazó la idea el mismo día en que se hizo pública.El veredicto de 77 páginas del Tribunal Supremo del estado, que incluye las opiniones de cada uno de los magistrados, se encuentra aquí.Los dos grupos son partes también de un caso federal que se presentó por separado conforme a la Ley Lanham, alegando que Lawrence está incurriendo en publicidad engañosa por seguir presentándose como obispo de la diócesis. La Ley Lanham regula las marcas registradas, las marcas de servicio y la competencia desleal. El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones del Cuarto Circuito devolvió el caso en febrero de 2017 al Tribunal Federal de Distrito en Charleston para una nueva vista.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora sénior y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tribunal Supremo de Carolina del Sur dictamina sobre caso de propiedades de la Iglesia Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 2, 2017 Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Property, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY South Carolina Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Alabama: bishop’s statement on Charlottesville

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Alabama: bishop’s statement on Charlottesville Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Aug 18, 2017 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Charlottesville, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Racial Justice & Reconciliation Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Advocacy Peace & Justice, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Episcopal Diocese of Alabama]August 17, 2017Hello, friendsI hope you all know I’m not one to burden you with my opinions every time there’s a story in the news; I hope you know I really don’t want to use my position to talk about politics. But at some point I think I’m failing in my responsibility as a bishop in God’s holy Church if I bury my head in the sand in this difficult moment for our nation, if I don’t try to call us back to the values we share as Christians, as Americans, as decent people.I don’t want to talk about the President, the liberals or the conservatives – I want to talk about the Good News of the love of God in Jesus Christ; I want to talk about us, and what I think we believe.We believe that the Lord God, eternal Creator of all that is, reached out to His wayward children when we had strayed into selfish and cowardly sinfulness, reached out through the birth, life, ministry, death and resurrection of Jesus the Messiah to save not only the people among whom He was born, but the whole world: the Jews, the Gentiles, the Samaritans, the Romans, the poor, the rich, the lepers, the Pharisees and Saducees, the tax collectors, the prostitutes – all of them, all of us.We believe that Jesus is still reaching out to the children of God, of all political assumptions and opinions, no matter what color we are or language we speak or who we love.Bigotry, hatred, violence, racism, antisemitism, and the idea that I or we are superior to her or him or them because of the immutable qualities of our births are contrary to Christian faith and teachings. They are not American values; they are not how decent people think or behave.Some of you reading these words will be disappointed that I didn’t go far enough; others will be distressed that I went too far. Some of you are more conservative than I am, and others more progressive. We disagree. And still you are all my brothers and sisters, because we are all children of our Father in heaven.That’s the Good News of Jesus; that’s what we believe. Even in the darkest and most difficult moments, you and I have the Light of Christ to shine, and the love of God to share. Amen – so be it.+Kee(the Rt. Rev. John McKee Sloan) Rector Smithfield, NC August 19, 2017 at 8:32 pm Thank you for clear vision +Kee. very well stated. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Deborah Matherne says: Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Un desastre tras otro: hacer frente a la fatiga de…

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Northern California wildfires 2017, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Una mujer se echa a llorar en los escombros de su casa quemada luego que un incendio forestal en California la destruyera. Foto de John Gress/REUTERS.[Episcopal News Service] Sería de perdonar que  a la gente le pareciera que se le agolpan los desastres naturales en 2017, especialmente en los meses transcurridos desde mayo.Existe tal cosa como la fatiga de la compasión. Si bien los primeros estudios se centraban en socorristas profesionales y cómo perdían la preocupación solidaria que alguna vez los inspiró, también se entiende que organizaciones e inclusos sociedades como un todo pueden padecer de lo que algunos llaman“fatiga de la empatía”.Ciertos estudios muestran que la empatía pública se esfuma a las pocas semanas de un desastre, ¿pero qué ocurre si los desastres siguen ocurriendo?El Rvdmo. Matt Gunter, obispo de la Diócesis de Fond du Lac, resumió este sentimiento a finales de octubre: “Estoy cansado. Me duele el corazón. Mi alma está fatigada”, escribió él en el artículo de un blog titulado “Amar al prójimo en una época de fatiga de la compasión” [Loving Your Neighbor in an Age of Compassion Fatigue].La publicación “parece haber tocado un nervio”, dijo Gunter a Episcopal News Service durante una entrevista el 20 de diciembre. “Elevó al máximo casi inmediatamente mis clics, luego, eso sugiere algo”, añadió.El mundo se ha enfrentado con mucho sufrimiento este año. Primero fueron las lluvias torrenciales de Sri Lanka en mayo que mataron al menos a 224 personas. Luego vino una serie de huracanes —Harvey, Irma y María— que arrasaron el Caribe Oriental e inundaron Texas con históricas precipitaciones desde agosto hasta principios de octubre. Las tormentas mataron a unas 800 personas, aunque el saldo de muertes es controvertido debido a las acusaciones de manipulación al proceso de atribuir bajas fatales a las tormentas. Los daños a la propiedad se calcula que bordean los $350.000 millones.En medio de esas tormentas, dos grandes terremotos sacudieron México en septiembre, dejando 470 muertos, desplazando a miles de persona s y dejando daños por un valor estimado de $2.000 millones.Imagen del satélite del 5 de diciembre muestra el humo de los incendios de Thomas, Rye y  Creek en el sur de California. Foto Observatorio Terrestres de la NASA.Luego, el norte de California estallo con devastadores y voraces incendios a mediados de octubre. Unas 44 personas murieron y las reclamaciones por seguros de la propiedad han ascendido a $9.400 millones. Y los californianos del sur están ahora sofocando los restos de los incendios que se extendieron por la zona de Los Ángeles a partir del 4 de diciembre. Ha muerto una persona y los daños a la propiedad aún no terminan de calcularse. Los costos de los desastres de EE.UU. tienen un triple efecto,  ya que las municipalidades afectadas esperan una reducción de sus ingresos tanto debido al costo de combatir los incendios como a la imposibilidad de recaudar impuestos sobre las propiedades destruidas.Añada a todo esto los desastres causados por los seres humanos: los asesinatos masivos en un concierto en Las Vegas y en una iglesia en Sutherland Springs, Texas; disturbios con fatalidades en Chalottesville, Virginia; y ataques terroristas en Manhattan. Recuérdese que hace cinco años, ocurrió lo de la escuela primaria de Newtown y la gente pensó que las cosas seguramente cambiarían  después que los niños fueron muertos a tiros en sus aulas. En lo que va de año, ha habido 413 agresiones a tiros en Estados Unidos en las cuales cuatro o más personas han sido alcanzadas, según estadísticas de Mass Shooting Tracker, un banco de datos de información pública sobre  agresiones masivas en EE.UU.Las noticias de desastres medioambientales y de violencia sectaria a través del mundo, se acompañan de las divisiones partidarias que se libran a través de las plataformas mediáticas en Estados Unidos y en todas partes, añaden lo que el psicólogo Jamil Zaki ha llamado una “habituación [que] pareja con una sensación de insensibilidad, puede agotar nuestra empatía, motivándonos a dejar de preocuparnos por las víctimas de tragedias”.“Darnos cínicamente por vencidos ante el saldo surreal de desastres naturales o de masacres y cambiar el canal puede ser [una reacción] autoprotectora, que cueste menos psicológicamente que experimentar vicariamente el sufrimiento de personas extrañas”, escribió él en 2011, el año en que Twitter entró en la Red. Desde entonces, los años han sido una explosión de noticias, de imágenes gráficas y vídeos, y de opiniones que han saturado los cerebros y corazones de la gente.“Comunicar el sufrimiento de otros no siempre genera empatía, e incluso puede ser contraproducente, por ejemplo, cuando una inundación del sufrimiento que se muestra en relatos y fotos deja los sentimientos de las personas impotentes y exhaustos”, dijo Zaki.Gunter, de Fond du Lac, dijo a ENS que él “no está seguro de que estemos programados mentalmente para absorberlo”. Hubo un tiempo en que las personas llevaban vidas bastante aisladas, enteradas de lo él llamaba  “las penas humanas normales” de las personas en sus comunidades, cosas como incendios de casas y ataques cardíacos y personas que morían demasiado pronto. Quizás tenían noticias de un terremoto y de otras suerte de destrucciones remotas. Pero ahora, cuando “enciendes la televisión, te enfrentas con trenes descarrilados e imágenes de guerra y de hambre”.Esas noticias instantáneas suscitan la interrogante de “cómo vamos a manejar el influjo de todas las noticias las 24 horas los 7 días de la semana”, dijo Gunter. Y a eso tienes que añadir el constante comentario político, que está fundamentalmente orientado a agitarlo a uno en primer lugar. Todos estamos nerviosos porque aquí hay personas que hacen dinero y adquieren poder e influencia por mantenernos inquietos. Eso es completamente otro sermón, pero es un lugar donde yo creo que la Iglesia tiene algo que decir”.En su blog, él sugirió que muchas personas han experimentado los síntomas de la fatiga de la compasión:  trastornos del sueño; pensamientos negativos involuntarios, imágenes o ideas desagradables; irritabilidad, impaciencia o acceso de cólera; hipervigilancia y “un deseo de evitar a personas que afectan o que sabes que perturbarán tu equilibrio”.Pueden manifestarse ansiedad y temor desmesurados. Gunter dijo a ENS que en las últimas semanas, al menos dos sacerdotes le han dicho que sus congregaciones han solicitado  [la presencia de] guardias armados en la iglesia.  Él le ha advertido a la gente a darse cuenta de que la masacre de la iglesia de Texas fue una disputa doméstica que se ventiló en un local que podría fácilmente haber sido una estación de correos o una tienda.Todas esas presiones, escribió él en su blog, pueden conducir a un “entumecimiento psíquico” que provoque que las personas quieran resguardarse y dejar de tratar de vivir con compasión por sus prójimos.“Y sin embargo, como cristianos, debemos resistir esta tendencia  incluso si reconocemos su realidad y su poder. En su resumen de la Ley, Jesús nos conmina ‘ama a tu prójimo como a ti mismo’. Eso es un llamado a la compasión, un llamado a al acción solidaria”, escribió Gunter.La cuestión es, le dijo él a ENS, “cómo sobreponerse al temor y la ansiedad que en muchos no es racional, es emotivo”. Y, añadió Gunter, dada la polarización en la sociedad, “la gente está pronta a decir que eres liberal o cualquier otra cosa y pueden descartarte porque no les estás dando lo que quieren”.La buena nueva del evangelio debe ser predicada y vivida “de una manera que pueda realmente oírse” por encima de todo el bullicio.El llamado a hacer eso y seguir siendo compasivo no siempre es fácil de responder, y la respuesta puede conducir a la misma fatiga que muchas personas están experimentando. El obispo ofreció algunos pasos para encontrar el equilibrio:Reserve tiempo cada día para orar, y no sólo en privado, sino con otros.Encuentre alguien con quien hablar que lo estimule en lugar de reforzarle las cosas que lo agitan.Reserve un tiempo sabático para “descansar de las preocupaciones del mundo” (evitando incluso las noticias y la Internet) y emprenda algo reparador.Reconozca la vulnerabilidad humana y la dependencia de Dios.Haga lo que pueda y confíele el resto a Dios, centrándose en el cuidado personal y asumiendo sólo lo que pueda manejar.Viva en lo positivo, no en lo negativo.Y cada día mencione las cosas buenas y dele gracias a Dios al menos por tres cosas.Gunter abunda sobre todas estas prácticas en su artículo del blog.Muchas personas le han dicho a Gunter que están intentando asumir esa última disciplina de la gratitud. Su entendimiento de la psicología  dice que “sólo esa simple práctica puede reorientar su perspectiva de una manera mensurable”– La Rda Mary Frances Schjonberg es la jefa de redacción interina de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Submit a Press Release Un desastre tras otro: hacer frente a la fatiga de la compasión puede resultar un desafío Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Las Vegas shooting, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ 2017 Hurricanes, Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Texas Church Shooting Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 21, 2017 Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Southern California wildfires 2017, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury hosts Grand Imam for religious leadership talks

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ecumenical & Interreligious Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release [Anglican Communion News Service] Bishops and primates from around the Anglican Communion were amongst a host of people who took part in discussions on religious leadership this week hosted by Archbishop Justin Welby and featuring the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, Ahmed el-Tayeb. The bishop of Egypt, Mouneer Anis, was amongst those who took part in the discussions at Lambeth Palace, the London official residence and offices of the Archbishop of Canterbury.Read the full article here. Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Archbishop of Canterbury hosts Grand Imam for religious leadership talks In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Jul 18, 2018 Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more