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Governor Wolf Announces $75 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 20 Counties

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces $75 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 20 Counties July 19, 2017 Environment,  Infrastructure,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced the investment of $75 million for 23 drinking water, wastewater, storm water and non-point source projects across 20 counties through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST).“PENNVEST initiated its new fiscal year of funding by approving loans and grants for a wide variety of water quality improvement projects in all corners of the Commonwealth”, said Governor Wolf. ”These projects and the environmental, economic development and public health benefits that they create will further our collective goal of a cleaner and safer place for our families to enjoy as well as my vision for a better Pennsylvania, both now and for years to come.”The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, federal grants to PENNVEST from the Environmental Protection Agency and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards. Funds for the projects are disbursed after bills for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST.For more information, visit www.pennvest.pa.gov or call 717-783-6798.MEDIA CONTACT:  Brion Johnson – 717-783-6798A list of project summaries follows.PENNVEST Drinking Water ProjectsBedford CountyBedford Township Municipal Authority received a $3,685,000 loan to eliminate the use of almost 100 drinking water wells, many of which are contaminated, and install four miles of distribution lines and a 522,000 gallon storage tank to provide clean and safe drinking water to the homes currently using these wells.**Clearfield and Jefferson CountiesFalls Creek Borough Municipal Authority received a $2,000,000 loan to construct more than two miles of drinking water transmission line in order to connect to the City of Dubois’ system and thereby provide the authority’s customers with a dependable supply of safe drinking water.**Erie CountyCorry City Municipal Authority received a $11,200,000 loan to construct more than five miles of new drinking water distribution lines and make a variety of other improvements as the first phase of its drinking water system renovation.**Indiana CountyIndiana County Municipal Services Authority received a $5,198,598 loan and a $4,760,402 grant to make a variety of improvements to five different drinking water systems that are operated by the authority in order to ensure the provision of safe drinking water to the residents served by these systems.**Lawrence CountyWampum Borough received a $460,000 loan to construct a supplemental drinking water filtration system that will improve the quality of the drinking water provided to residents, along with related monitoring equipment and a building to house that equipment.Mifflin CountyNewton Hamilton Borough received a $2,789,322 loan and a $1,386,678 grant to eliminate leaks and increase flow by replacing almost three miles of asbestos cement pipe distribution lines with new ten-inch ductile iron pipe as well as make other improvements to the borough’s distribution system.Northampton CountyHillendale on the Delaware, Inc. received a $310,000 loan to construct a building that will house an above ground water storage tank, a disinfection system and booster pumps, as well as make other improvements to its drinking water treatment and distribution system.Tioga CountyUpper Tioga River Regional Authority received a $6,463,664 loan and a $2,455,336 grant to construct a new drinking water distribution system to serve residents of Covington, Putnam and Richmond Townships.**PENNVEST Wastewater ProjectsBedford CountyBedford Township Municipal Authority received a $2,146,210 loan to construct almost four miles of new sewage collection lines as well as a pump station to eliminate malfunctioning on lot systems.**Cambria CountyFranklin Borough received a $668,682 loan and a $612,318 grant to replace about half a mile of deteriorated 100 year-old sewage collection pipe as well as replace 36 house lateral lines. Johnstown City received a $5,580,000 loan to replace more than four miles of sanitary sewer laterals in the Ohio Street and Moxham areas of the city in order to reduce infiltration and inflows of excess water into the city’s sanitary sewer system.  **Johnstown Redevelopment Authority received an $8,134,750 loan to rehabilitate or replace more than two miles of interceptor sewers in the Homerstown/Ohio Street area of Johnstown City. **Centre CountyPotter Township received a $1,677,623 loan and a $1,378,094 grant to construct a 14 thousand gallon per day sewage treatment plant, three and a half miles of new force mains as well as install fifty-seven new septic tanks.Huntingdon CountyMapleton Area Joint Municipal Authority received a $179,576 loan and a $164,440 grant to upgrade its existing sewage treatment system by installing a new clarifier to be used in conjunction with existing clarifiers and also to construct a new pump station.Montour CountyCooper Township Municipal Authority received a $3,146,493 loan and an $861,007 grant to construct more than nine miles of new sewage collection and transmission lines as well as a new pump station.Warren CountyNorth Warren Municipal Authority received a $4,250,000 loan to construct and install a variety of improvements to its existing sewage treatment facility in order to improve the treatment process and the quality of the water it discharges.**Washington CountyChartiers Township received an $875,000 loan to create a new gravity sewage collection system by constructing almost two miles of new collection lines.Wyoming CountyLemon Township & Tunkhannock Joint Municipal Authority received a $642,500 loan to design a new sewage collection and treatment system, including almost 10 miles of low pressure force mains, a 120 thousand gallons per-day treatment plant and other facilities to serve 382 residences in the township.Non-point Source Water Quality Improvement ProjectsClarion CountyArmstrong Conservation District received a $925,754 grant to install a variety of best management practices, including infiltration trenches, vegetated swales, revegetation and reforestation along trails as well as removal of coal refuse.  **Centre CountyTri-Municipal Park received a $107,891 loan and a $215,778 grant to construct vegetated swales, rain gardens and a detention/infiltration basin in order to eliminate storm water runoff into a sinkhole and a nearby stream. **Lancaster CountyChester County Conservation District and Elam King received a $394,520 grant to install a new manure storage structure, animal walkways, roof gutters and downspouts and other facilities in order to reduce storm water runoff and nutrients from entering the nearby stream. **Snyder CountyMiddleburg Borough received a $978,500 grant to construct almost a mile of new storm sewers, 32 storm sewer inlets, and 1,400 feet of drainage swales.York CountyYork County Rail Trail Authority received a $950,000 grant to construct a 1.2 mile section of new trail and an on-site infiltration system in order to enhance the naturally occurring riparian buffer on the adjacent portion of Codorus Creek. **** denotes funding is sourced from the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (DWSRF) or Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund (CWSRF)# # # SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Rain is melting Greenlands ice even in winter raising fears about sea

first_imgStudy co-author Marco Tedesco of Columbia University studies a rushing meltwater stream within Greenland’s Russell Glacier in July 2018. Kevin Krajick/Earth Institute, Columbia University Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Alex FoxMar. 7, 2019 , 9:00 AM Email Rain is melting Greenland’s ice, even in winter, raising fears about sea level risecenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Rising global temperatures are making Greenland feel a bit more like the United Kingdom—and that’s bad news for the ice sheet that covers the massive arctic island. Rain is becoming more frequent, melting ice and setting the stage for far more melt in the future, according to a new study. Even more disturbing, researchers say, is that raindrops are pockmarking areas of the ice sheet even in the dead of winter and that as the climate warms, those areas will expand.“This is what climate change looks like, it’s the ‘Atlantification’ of the Arctic,” says climate scientist Ruth Mottram of the Danish Meteorological Institute in Copenhagen, who was not involved in the study. “This paper identifies a really important mechanism and we need to figure out how it plays into our predictions of sea level rise.”Each year, the hot knife of climate change excises 270 billion tons of ice from Greenland’s more than 1.7-million-square-kilometer ice sheet. Between 1992 and 2011, all that lost ice raised global sea level roughly 7.5 millimeters. Roughly half of the ice loss in that period occurred at the ice sheet’s edge in the form of icebergs cleaving from glaciers and thundering into the sea. But in recent years, satellite monitoring has revealed that 70% of Greenland’s contributions to sea level rise has come from meltwater, not ice. Since melting on the surface of the ice sheet came to dominate in 2011, Greenland’s annual contribution to global sea level rise has doubled. Warming has driven this acceleration and, over the past 30 years or so, average air temperatures at the ice sheet warmed by as much as 1.8°C in summer, and up to 3°C in winter.To better understand the causes of this accelerating melt, climate scientists used more than 30 years of satellite data to pinpoint “melt events” when the amount of liquid water on the ice sheet suddenly increased. To detect these events, the satellites exploited liquid water’s unique ability to absorb and emit microwave radiation from the sun. Water emits 100 times more microwave radiation than snow, allowing the satellites to detect even slight increases.By combining the satellite data with local weather readings, the team could determine whether rain or other factors instigated melt events. The researchers identified 313 melt events caused by rain from 1979 to 2012. Over the study period, the melt caused by rainy weather doubled during summer, and tripled during winter, the team reports today in The Cryosphere.The weather patterns sending this moisture to Greenland are not new, says lead author Marilena Oltmanns of Germany’s GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel. But because the background temperature is higher, more of this moisture is falling as rain rather than snow.The impacts of this rain on the ice sheet extend beyond the moment drops are falling, says study co-author Marco Tedesco of Columbia University. Rain in Greenland is typically delivered by warm, moisture-laden winds from the south. These clouds linger, trapping the warm air they rode in on like a blanket, driving increased melting for days after the rain subsides.The wintertime rain could have even more lasting consequences. Rain-induced melt in winter may quickly refreeze, but the rained-on snow forms a crusty layer that absorbs more sunlight than fresh powder. After decades of increasingly frequent winter rain, the snowpack contains so many of these layers that they accelerate melting when exposed to the sun in the summer, Tedesco says.The surface melting caused by rain could even be accelerating the flow of glaciers, increasing the quantity of ice they deliver into the sea, Oltmanns says. If further work shows meltwater seeping beneath the glaciers does speed their march to the sea, it could lead to even more ice loss than the rain itself, she says.Greenland holds enough ice to deliver 7 meters of sea level rise—enough to submerge much of lower Manhattan in New York City—but predicting how fast that rise occurs requires work like this, detailed the mechanisms behind the melt.“These systems have the potential to cause big changes,” Oltmanns says. “How little we understand about them is frightening.”last_img read more